Tool Reviews

38 Microsoft Teams

Overview

Watch overview videoMicrosoft Teams (4:47)

Description

Microsoft Teams is a collaborative tool that allows a multitude of users in various locations to work and share in a common space.  It is a workspace that multiple users can edit files collaboratively in real-time. It is linked to the online Microsoft Office suite of products and allows for the integration of third-party apps.  There are options to work on and off-line. There is also a mobile app so that there is access to work anywhere. It is designed to be a central hub for productivity.

Justification for Using this Tool

Microsoft Teams connects to various Learning Theories and Instructional Design Principles.  The following are just some examples of how Teams has been developed using these principles thus being classified as a good Web Based Learning Tool.

Segmenting Principle

Segmenting is best applied to complex material and when the user is inexperienced with the material.  This is achieved from being able to break material down into smaller learning ‘chunks’. These are called ‘channels’. The limit for channel creation is 200, giving the user ample opportunities to segment the work appropriately.

Practice Principle

The ability for the learner to practice what they are learning is instrumental in them being successful in mastering the content.  There are multiple platforms in Microsoft Teams to accomplish this. There is a choice to integrate third Party apps to provide feedback on completed work, or the Assignments option within Teams itself can be used to provide even more detailed grading and feedback. Students can also collaborate with peers for instant feedback with the use of the chat, video call or with the use of the class notebook.

Collaboration Theory

Teams supports this concept by granting multiple users to have the ability to give input on a multitude of topics by allowing collaboration on assignments and projects in real-time.  (CLICK) Students can also video call other classmates or their instructor to discuss ‘face-to-face’ for a more personalized experience. The integration of the third-party app Flip-grid will allow participants to record small videos of their progress or words of encouragement to share with the group for an additional motivation to others.  Having a designated chat area, allows students to brainstorm with their peers for possible problem solutions.

Learner Control

Students are free to navigate through content while taking as much or as little time as they like with any materials posted within each channel.  Teams supports the Learner Control Principle as there is no set way that the student must navigate through content. Students can also revisit any or all material as needed.  External resources can be used for students for a deeper understanding of material being presented, and by incorporating third-party apps like ‘Forms’, students can be polled and then placed within a level that is appropriate to their skill set, allowing for the implementation of Adaptive Control for the learner.

Strategies for Use

Strategy 1 – Assignment and Rubric Creation

Watch overview videoAssignment and Rubric Creation (8:38)

There are so many benefits to using Microsoft Teams for the classroom.  The focus of this video is to demonstrate how to create an assignment and a corresponding rubric.  Ensuring AODA compliance is also featured

Strategy 2 – Grading and Feedback

Watch overview videoAssignment Grading and Meaningful Feedback (7:26)

There are so many benefits to using Microsoft Teams for the classroom.  The focus of this video will be to demonstrate how to grade an assignment submission and to provide detailed and meaningful feedback for your students.

Helpful Resources

Resource 1 – Building a Collaborative Classroom

This website gives great examples on how teachers can use it to work collaboratively with other faculty.  Using a quick video call to another instructor in another part of the school will increase the likelihood of collaboration, which leads to better teaching.  Using Teams also levels the field for all participants. For the student that isn’t likely to share in a group environment, is more likely to participate when discussions and collaboration is held on-line

Resource 2 – Best Practices for Teams in Classroom

What better way to learn about a tool, than from the developers themselves?!  This website hosted by Microsoft details how to effectively use Teams, by demonstrating the possible ways to set up your ‘channel’ so that everyone is getting the most out of the software as possible.  There are many examples on how to set-up, organize, label, and describe the purpose of each channel.

References

Best practices for school leaders creating teams and channels in Microsoft teams for education. (2020).  Microsoft Office. Available from https://support.office.com/en-us/article/best-practices-for-school-leaders-creating-teams-and-channels-in-microsoft-teams-for-education-f3663ad9-a835-4971-9acb-6725a543c003

Clark, R.C., & Mayer, R. E., (2011).  Applying the segmenting and pretraining principles: Managing complexity by breaking a lesson into parts.  In Matthew Davis (Ed), e-Learning and the science of instruction: proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (pp. 204-220).  San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer

Clark, R.C., & Mayer, R. E., (2011).  Does Practice Make Perfect? In Matthew Davis (Ed), e-Learning and the science of instruction: proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (pp. 251-276).  San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer

Clark, R.C., & Mayer, R. E., (2011).  Learning Together Virtually. In Matthew Davis (Ed), e-Learning and the science of instruction: proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (pp. 279-306).  San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer

Clark, R.C., & Mayer, R. E., (2011).  Who’d in control? Guidelines for e-learning navigation.  In Matthew Davis (Ed), e-Learning and the science of instruction: proven guidelines for consumers and designers of multimedia learning (pp. 309-338).  San Francisco, CA: Pfeiffer

Gonzalez, J. (2018, August 5). Build a collaborative classroom with Microsoft teams. [Web log post].  Cult of pedagogy. Available from https://www.cultofpedagogy.com/microsoft-teams/

Johnson, D.W., Johnson, R.T., & Smith, K. (2007). The state of cooperative learning in postsecondary and professional settings. Educational Psychology Review, 19, (pp. 15–29)

Author

Submitted by: Roxanne Stewart
Email: roxanne.stewart@ontariotechu.net
Bio: Completing M. Ed program at Ontario Tech University.  Partial Load Professor with Durham College specializing in SAP, Microsoft Office and Basic Accounting Principles.

License

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E-Learning Essentials 2020 by Power Learning Solutions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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